Parks & Facilities Details

Friedrich Wilderness Park


Friedrich Wilderness Park offers approximately 10 miles of hiking trails with varying degrees of difficulty. It is home for rare birds, terrestrial orchids, steep hills and deep canyons. It is internationally known for bird watching. Perched on the edge if the Balcones Escarpment, Friedrich is a nesting site for two federally listed endangered species of birds: the Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler. 

Restrooms and water fountains are found at the entrance to the park. Visitors are encouraged to bring water bottles for longer hikes in warm weather. In order to protect this wilderness area, it is important to observe the following rules:

  • No fires, 
  • no smoking on trails,
  •  Stay on designated trails. 
  • Pedestrians only please; roller blades, skateboards, scooters, bicycles, etc., are not allowed.
  • To protect the endangered species, pets, including dogs, are not allowed. 

 

Friedrich Wilderness Parks is a nesting site for two federally listed endangered species of birds the Black-capped vireo and the
Golden–cheeked Warbler. To protect the habitat for the endangered species pets, fires, and smoking are not allowed. Pedestrians only, no roller blades, skateboards, scooters or bicycles. Alcohol prohibited.

Click here to view the Trail Accessibility Map and for programming visit our Nature and Science page.

Trail Closures

Because Friedrich Wilderness Park is a Natural Area, our primary mission is conservation and resource management. Water saturated trails become muddy and sometimes impassable. On those occasions, the trails are closed until they dry out. Hikers and runners often go around the puddles, which widens the trails. This also leads to erosion and trail damage. As good stewards, we must minimize these types of negative impacts. We greatly appreciate your willingness to help us in this mission to protect our natural resources! Find trail conditions on our Facebook page, and Twitter, or call Friedrich Wilderness Park office at 210-207-3781. 


Programs & Classes

Use the button below to view and register for classes at this location. If there are no results for classes at this location, a list of classes, programs, and activities at alternate locations will be provided.
View & Register for Classes
Si necesita asistencia en español para inscribirse en clases o necesita información sobre nuestros programas llame al 210-207-3047.

 

Park History

In 1971, Norma Friedrich Ward bequeathed 180 acres of land on Heuermann Road near Leon Springs to the City of San Antonio for use as a public park. She also gave $100,000 to make improvements to the land. It was Mrs. Ward’s wish that the natural vegetation and native trees and shrubs be protected and that native birds and wildlife be protected and encouraged to use the park as a sanctuary.

The following year, Wilbur Matthews and Glen Martin donated another 52 acres to enlarge the park according to the same guidelines specified by Mrs. Ward.

The park was developed with a grant from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and was dedicated on August 31, 1978.

Today, Emilie and Albert Friedrich Park features nearly 10 miles of hiking trails with varying degrees of difficulty. It is home to rare birds, terrestrial orchids, steep hills and deep canyons. It is internationally known for bird watching, with nesting sites for two federal listed endangered species of birds: the Black-capped Vireo and the Golden-cheeked Warbler. Approximately 600 acres, the public can enjoy nature trails, including a handicapped accessible trails, and environmental programs that educate visitors about the park’s vegetation and wildlife. The Friends of San Antonio Natural Areas provide volunteer support for the park, and the Master Naturalist Program utilizes the park to study soil and water resources, ecology, native Texas Plants, and archaeology.

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Wednesday, July 26, 2017