Metropolitan Health District
What You Need To Know

Office

COVID-19 Hotline
210.207.5779
Email: COVID-19@sanantonio.gov
Mon. - Fri., 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sat. & Sun., 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Services
See a complete listing of our Clinics & Locations.

Administrative Office (No services offered at this location)
111 Soledad, Suite 1000
San Antonio, TX 78205

Phone
210.207.8780

What is Ebola?

Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal disease that affects humans and some animals. It is caused by the Ebola virus. A large outbreak is now occurring in the West African nations of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. There are currently no Ebola cases in San Antonio or in the United States.

Now that someone in Texas was diagnosed with Ebola, am I at a higher risk?

No. The only way to get infected with Ebola is to come into direct contact with an infected person’s body fluids.

What about common spaces?

Common areas in the building, such as stairwells, elevators, corridors, doorknobs, conference rooms, cafeterias, mailboxes, gyms and other common areas continue to be safe for use.

Can dogs get infected or sick with Ebola?

At this time, there have been no reports of dogs or cats becoming sick with Ebola or of being able to spread Ebola to people or other animals. Even in areas in Africa where Ebola is present, there have been no reports of dogs and cats becoming sick with Ebola. There is limited evidence that dogs become infected with Ebola virus, but there is no evidence that they develop disease.

Can monkeys spread Ebola?

Yes, monkeys are at risk for Ebola. Symptoms of Ebola infection in monkeys include fever, decreased appetite, and sudden death. Monkeys should not be allowed to have contact with anyone who may have Ebola. Healthy monkeys already living in the United States and without exposure to a person infected with Ebola are not at risk for spreading Ebola.

Can bats spread Ebola?

Fruit bats in Africa are considered to be a natural reservoir for Ebola. Bats in North America are not known to carry Ebola and so CDC considers the risk of an Ebola outbreak from bats occurring in the United States to be very low. However, bats are known to carry rabies and other diseases here in the United States. To reduce the risk of disease transmission, never attempt to touch a bat, living or dead.

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24/7 Emergency Contact

By phone: dial 210.207.8876

For Professionals
Health Data Reports

Health Data Reports
Health related data and reports.

Reportable Diseases

Reportable Diseases
Prevent infectious disease outbreaks…

Trauma-Informed Care

Trauma-Informed Care

Committed to addressing the impact of trauma.