Early Statehood and the Antebellum Periods

Late in December of 1845, the United States Congress approved the Texas State Constitution, and Texas became as a state. Prior to statehood, San Antonio and the Texas frontier was a dangerous place full of uncertainty. As a result of the continuous warfare and exile of Mexican sympathizers, San Antonio’s population had dwindled down to about 800 citizens by 1846 (Fehrenbach 2009). Following Texas’s statehood, San Antonio began to grow quickly with many new settlers establishing homes in the vicinity of the missions near existing settlements such as La Villita (THC 1972).

Historic Districts

King William Historic District

King William Historic District

The National Register of Historic Places-listed King William Historic District is generally located between the San Antonio River, Cesar Chavez Boulevard, South St. Mary’s Street, and South Alamo Street...

La Villita Historic District

La Villita Historic District

The National Register of Historic Places-listed La Villita Historic District is located a few blocks from Alamo Plaza near downtown San Antonio. It includes twenty-seven nineteenth century dwellings representing unique examples of early residential development in the city...

Lavaca Historic District

Lavaca Historic District

The National Register of Historic Places-listed and locally designated Lavaca Historic District is located southeast of downtown San Antonio about two blocks east of the King William Historic District and south of HemisFair Park...

South Alamo Street-South St. Mary’s Street Historic District

South Alamo Street-South St. Mary’s Street Historic District

The National Register of Historic Places-listed South Alamo Street-South St. Mary’s Street Historic District is generally located between the San Antonio River, South Alamo Street, and South St. Mary’s Street...

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